Chemical control of sperm success by female mussels

A fascinating study, published in Evolution Letters, has provided new insight into the subtle ways that females can influence paternity. The work was carried out on a species of mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), which releases its eggs and sperm into the ocean, resulting in sperm from lots of different males competing for fertilisation. The research found … Continue reading Chemical control of sperm success by female mussels

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Twisted sex overcomes barriers to gene flow in mirror image snails

A new study in Evolution Letters has shown that two types of snails are the same species, despite previously being considered distinct because their shells coil in the opposite direction. Not only are the snails genetically similar, but surprisingly, they are able to have sex despite their physical differences. Here Dr Angus Davison, one of … Continue reading Twisted sex overcomes barriers to gene flow in mirror image snails

Cheats never prosper – social policing maintains honesty in cooperative fish

What prevents animals from lying to each other? Can cheats ever prosper? A study published in Evolution Letters has provided new insight into the evolution of honest signals in cooperative Princess of Burundi cichlid fish, demonstrating that the reliability of communication between individuals is maintained by social policing. We asked Hugo Gante, a researcher at … Continue reading Cheats never prosper – social policing maintains honesty in cooperative fish

Genomic adaptation to life in extreme environments

Dr Domino Joyce explains what her team's new research tells us about how animals adapt to challenging environments - and how quickly it can happen. As we explore more of the earth’s extreme environments, we learn more about how organisms have adapted to life there. Many deep sea creatures have become familiar such as the … Continue reading Genomic adaptation to life in extreme environments

Female selection for reproductive investment: what about the males?

A new study published in Evolution Letters has revealed a positive correlation between male and female reproductive success in Japanese quail. Here, lead author Dr Joel Pick describes the unique study system used for this work, and explains what the findings tell us about individual variation in reproductive investment. Why variation in reproductive function exists … Continue reading Female selection for reproductive investment: what about the males?

What vegetable seeds tell us about the intentions of ancient farmers

A new study published in Evolution Letters, available now via Early View, has given us an interesting insight into the history of crop domestication. The work, by researchers at The University of Sheffield, UK, and the University of Toulouse, France, shows that seed enlargement probably evolved without the deliberate intention of early crop farmers. Humans … Continue reading What vegetable seeds tell us about the intentions of ancient farmers

Highlights from our inaugural issue

It's here! The first issue of our exciting new evolutionary biology journal is now online, featuring sex, sperm, speciation, and more! All papers are available to read right now, fully open access, via the Evolution Letters website http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/evl3.2017.1.issue-1/issuetoc Here is what our inaugural issue has in store... Gibson, Delph, & Lively: The two-fold cost of sex: … Continue reading Highlights from our inaugural issue