Two thirds of morphological changes in Drosophila are evolutionarily repetitive

A new study published in Evolution Letters has shed light on the limits of morphological evolution. Here, author Amir Yassin tells us more. Nearly 150 years ago, Charles Darwin exalted about the ‘endless forms’ of life that evolution has produced. However, recent studies have indicated that several biological forms repeatedly evolved in distant lineages, such as … Continue reading Two thirds of morphological changes in Drosophila are evolutionarily repetitive

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A friend in need is a friend indeed

New research published today in Evolution Letters reveals that some individuals are so systematically disadvantaged by competition with members of their own species that they enter into an alliance with another species to become more competitive. Lead author Syuan-Jyun Sun explains what they found. Mutualisms between species are ubiquitous, and are also key to maintaining … Continue reading A friend in need is a friend indeed

Mating snails and population modelling: what can this tell us about the evolution of reproductive traits?

A new study published in Evolution Letters tests whether reinforcement plays a role in the divergence of mating preference and genital morphology during speciation. Here, author Dr Mauricio Montano-Rendon explains what they found. There is usually more than one way to go about most things in life. Choosing a mate is certainly one of them, with … Continue reading Mating snails and population modelling: what can this tell us about the evolution of reproductive traits?

Competition and evolutionary opportunity: from birds to bacteria

A new study in Evolution Letters uses experimental evolution to demonstrate how species interactions shape abiotic adaptation, and provides rare insight into the underlying genetics. Lead author James P.J. Hall tells us more. On the Galapagos island of Daphne Major lives the medium ground finch Geospiza fortis. This small bird eats seeds, large and small, … Continue reading Competition and evolutionary opportunity: from birds to bacteria

The evolution of psychiatric disorders and human personality traits

In a new paper published in Evolution Letters, a research team from Tohoku University reveal the evolution of a gene related to human-unique psychiatric traits. Here, authors Daiki Sato and Masakado Kawata tell us more about their findings. How and why unique human characteristics, such as highly social behavior, languages, and complex cultures, have evolved … Continue reading The evolution of psychiatric disorders and human personality traits

The influence of the beginning of life on the end: A silver-spoon for senescence?

Why do individuals vary in how quickly they age? Eve Cooper explains what her new research tells us about the effect of developmental environment on senescence. As humans, the process of senescence - experiencing physiological declines as we age - is a seemingly inescapable constraint of our own biology. But why is it that we … Continue reading The influence of the beginning of life on the end: A silver-spoon for senescence?

Does sexual selection help or hinder population performance?

A new study published today in Evolution Letters shows that populations with an evolutionary history of strong sexual selection are able to invade competitor populations more rapidly. Here, lead author Dr Joanne Godwin tells us more. Costs: sexual selection vs. natural selection No discussion of sexual selection is complete without the clichéd picture of a … Continue reading Does sexual selection help or hinder population performance?

Speciation on the beach: solving the mystery of the most misidentified marine organism in the world

In our latest author blog, Rui Faria, Kerstin Johannesson, Mark Ravinet, and Roger Butlin explain how their intensive study of an intertidal hybrid zone has shed new light on the processes of divergence and speciation. The rough periwinkle, Littorina saxatilis, is a world champion when it comes to complicating the life of a biologist trying … Continue reading Speciation on the beach: solving the mystery of the most misidentified marine organism in the world