Disentangling the complex interactions between females and the sperm of multiple males

A new study published in Evolution Letters dissects the complex processes and interactions between the sexes that determine which male fathers the offspring when females have mated with different males. Here, lead author Stefan Lüpold explains the motivation for, and key conclusions of, the study. Students of evolutionary biology will at some point encounter sexual selection, a … Continue reading Disentangling the complex interactions between females and the sperm of multiple males

Searching for sexually antagonistic genes: the story behind the paper

A new Comment & Opinion piece published in Evolution Letters provides a roadmap for analysing genetic data in the context of sex-specific adaptation. Here, lead author Filip Ruzicka explains the motivation for and key conclusions of the study. Sexual dimorphism—or differences in female and male traits—represents the most striking instance of adaptive differentiation within single … Continue reading Searching for sexually antagonistic genes: the story behind the paper

Uncovering cryptic genetic divergence across environmental gradients

A new study published in Evolution Letters suggests that large blocks of linked genes play a key role in maintaining adaptation to local conditions despite extensive connectivity across latitudes in an estuarine fish. Here, Nina Overgaard Therkildsen and her co-authors explain how this study highlights that field observations of phenotypic similarity across a species’ range … Continue reading Uncovering cryptic genetic divergence across environmental gradients

Hybridizing toads with different sex chromosomes

A new study published in Evolution Letters shows that species with different sex chromosomes can interbreed. Lead author Prof Christophe Dufresnes tells us more. How do organisms become male or female? It varies between vertebrates. Humans, like all mammals, do it with a Y chromosome – a chromosome that carries a “male determining” gene that … Continue reading Hybridizing toads with different sex chromosomes

An ancient association? Crickets disperse seeds of an early-diverging orchid

A new study published in Evolution Letters presents evidence of the apparently unusual seed dispersal system by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae. Lead author Dr. Kenji Suetsugu tells us more.  Seed dispersal is a key evolutionary process and a central theme in terrestrial plant ecology. Animal-mediated seed … Continue reading An ancient association? Crickets disperse seeds of an early-diverging orchid

How does competition shape variation in metabolic rates?

A new study published in Evolution Letters investigates why metabolic rates are so variable between organisms. Here, lead author Dr Amanda Pettersen tell us what she found. Metabolic rate - the rate at which organisms take up, transform, and expend energy, is linked with the “pace-of-life”. Individuals with high metabolic rates often grow faster, reproduce … Continue reading How does competition shape variation in metabolic rates?

The architecture of adaptation: a master mutation or a mass of mutations?

A new study published in Evolution Letters demonstrates that rapid adaptation in natural populations of sticklebacks results from both genetic linkage (where multiple mutations located close together in the genome are inherited together) and pleiotropy (where the same mutation leads to changes in many traits). Lead author Dr Sophie Archambeault tells us more. When organisms … Continue reading The architecture of adaptation: a master mutation or a mass of mutations?

Are my enemies my future friends? They could be for this tiny fly

A new experimental study, published in Evolution Letters, reveals that the loss of predators from communities can make it more difficult for prey species to adapt to uncertain future environments. Lead author Dr Matt Barbour tells us more. We are in the midst of the Earth’s sixth mass extinction. As an ecologist, I find this troubling … Continue reading Are my enemies my future friends? They could be for this tiny fly

Publishing with Evolution Letters during the coronavirus pandemic

Here at Evolution Letters, we are committed to publishing the best new evolutionary biology research in a timely fashion, and will continue to do so as best we can throughout the coronavirus pandemic. We strongly encourage the evolutionary biology community to continue submitting manuscripts and writing reviews during this time. We know that our authors, … Continue reading Publishing with Evolution Letters during the coronavirus pandemic